BRILLIANCY TEST SUITE (2 min/move)

Discussion of anything and everything relating to chess playing software and machines.

Moderators: hgm, Harvey Williamson, bob

Forum rules
This textbox is used to restore diagrams posted with the [d] tag before the upgrade.
premio53

BRILLIANCY TEST SUITE (2 min/move)

Post by premio53 » Sun Oct 07, 2007 2:21 am

I've been out of chess for quite a while now and haven't kept up with the latest engines. I was laid off my job and started playing around again with various chess programs. I started running a few through a test suite I put together a few years ago and here a few of the results. The big surprise was "Slow Blitz." I had never heard of it and simply downloaded it by chance off some website. It scored better than both Crafty 20.14 and Arasan 10. I ran the tests on a Toshiba notebook with a 1733Mhz dual core processor and 1 gig RAM. Here are the tests that each program got right.

Slow Blitz 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 14, 16, 17,

Crafty 20.14 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10, 14, 17, 23

Arasan 10 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, 10, 14, 17, 23, 25

I love the GUI that comes with Slow Blitz and wish Jon Dart and other programmers would provide a little more polished interface with theirs. I believe more people would use them more as a result of that. Slow Blitz may well replace my beloved Genius program which seems to have died in the mind of Richard Lang. I would be interested in how some of the commercial programs do in solving some of these problems. It's been a while since I tried to post a diagram so these may not work. Regards.

BRILLIANCY TEST SUITE (2 min/move)

[Event "Test 1"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]3rk2r/p4pRp/4p3/q1pPn3/1pP5/4p2B/PQ2KP1P/2R5 b - - bm Rxd5

{ BLACK TO MOVE: 20...Rxd5!! A spectactular sacrifice to open a line for
the queen toward the White king. (Fedorowitz-Shamkovich, New York 1981)
The Mammouth Book of Chess p. 218} Rxd5 *


[Event "Test 2"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]8/5p1p/1p2pPk1/p1p1P3/P1P1K2b/4B3/1P5P/8 w - - bm b4


{WHITE TO MOVE: 1.b4!! White wins by using an interesting tactic designed to
clear the way for the a4-pawn's advance. It's based on the fact that
Black's queenside pawns are resting on dark squares, thus making them
vulnerable to attack by White's Bishop. (Smyslov-Yastrebov, Moscow 1936). How
to Reassess Your Chess Workbook, p. 326} 1. b4 *


[Event "Test 3"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]3r2k1/1ppr3p/p2p1p2/4pNbR/2P1P1P1/1PP3P1/P4PK1/3R4 w - - bm Rhh1

{WHITE TO MOVE: 1.Rhh1!! The subtle point of White's play. By
forcing...f7-f6, White has taken away a route of retreat from the Black
Bishop. White now intends to win the bishop with Rhf1 and f4. There is no
defense against this threat. "How to Reassess Your Chess Workbook", p. 376} 1.
Rhh1 *


[Event "Test 4"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]1r1q1rk1/2p1bppp/p5b1/3pP3/Bn1Pn3/2N1BN1P/1P2QPP1/R2R2K1 w - - bm Na2

{WHITE TO MOVE: 1.Na2!! We reach a position that was once thought to be
allright for Black. However, a new move was unveiled that cut to the heart of
the position and showed that White is actually clearly better.
(Short-Karpov,Linares Match 1992). How to Reassess Your Chess Workbook, p.
125} 1. Na2 *


[Event "Test 5"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r5k1/1b1n2q1/pp1p3p/1p1Pp1p1/5r2/2P1N2P/PPB2PP1/R2QR1K1 w - - bm a4

{WHITE TO MOVE: 1.a4!! A very deep move. The idea is to force an exchange
of one pair of Rooks after 1...bxa4 2.Rxa4. This in turn, will give
White permanent control over the f5-square. Anand points out that neither
1.Bf5 Rf82.Be6+ Kh8 nor 1.g3 Rf6 2.Bf5 Raf8 gives White much.TEST 5 is a game
from Anand-Kamsky, Las Palmas Match 1995 in "How to Reassess Your Chess
Workbook," p. 211. } 1. a4 *


[Event "Test 6"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]2rq1rk1/pb1nbpp1/5n1p/2pp4/5B2/2N1PN2/PPQ1BPPP/R2R2K1 w - - bm a4

{WHITE TO MOVE: 1.a4!! Portisch made the comment "What move is this? He's
just weakening his queenside. Is that really so? Oh no, he's starting to push
the pawn to a5 where it will take the important b6-square from my Knight."
Black figured out the first point of a2-a4: if the pawn can get to a5 it
will severely restrict the movements of the Black Queen and make b6
in accessible to the d7-Knight. TEST 6 is a game from Kasparov-L. Portisch,
OHRA 1986 in "How to Reassess Your Chess Workbook," p. 228.} 1. a4 *

[Event "Test 7"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r3r1k1/p1q2ppp/2p1pn2/3p1b2/1Q1P4/1PP2N1P/P4PP1/R3KB1R b - - bm e5

{BLACK TO MOVE: 1...e5!! Ripping the center open so that the Black army
can reach the centrally placed White King. 1...Rab8 is possible as long as
you thought that this move made the following ...e5 advance even stronger
(it actually forces the White Queen to run to a better square). How to
Reassess Your Chess Workbook, p. 250} e5 *


[Event "Test 8"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]3qrbk1/3b1pp1/p2p1n1p/2pP4/nrP1P3/3B2NP/P1QB2PN/1R2R1K1 b - - bm Qc7

{BLACK TO MOVE: 1...Qc7!! This fine move gives up the Exchange for
several positional plusses. By making this sacrifice, Black gives himself
something to play with. Of course, he could have retained material equality by
1...Rxb1, but then every advantage would have been on the opponent's side. No
self-respecting grandmaster would accept such a dismal state of affairs!
(Tal-Gligoric,Candidates' Quarter Final Match 1968). How to Reassess Your
Chess Workbook, p.258} Qc7 *


[Event "Test 9"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r1b2rk1/pp3p1p/4pBp1/5q2/3P3Q/4K1R1/P4P1P/R7 b - - bm e5

{BLACK TO MOVE: 1...e5!! Black is two pawns up and doesn't have to worry
about giving one back. Thus, for the small price of one tiny pawn, Black opens
up the center (White's King is far from happy there!) and frees the Bishop on
c8.(Thomas-Williams, San Francisco 1996). How to Reassess Your Chess Workbook
TEST 9 is found on p. 260 in "How to Reassess Your Chess Workbook."} e5 *

[Event "Test 10"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]2r1r1k1/1b2qp1n/3p2p1/1ppP3p/1n2P3/1P2NN1P/3Q1PP1/RB2R1K1 w - - bm Nd1

{WHITE TO MOVE: 1.Nd1!! The best move without a doubt. White's Knight
retreat,though odd looking, stops Black's ...Ng5 (White's Queen now hits that
square) and prepares to swing the Knight around to c3 where it takes aim at
Black's loose pawn on b5. Black can save his pawn by moving his b4-Knight and
pushing the b-pawn to b4, but that leaves a once-active Knight on a poor
square, and also creates a hole on c4. (Anand-Kamsky, Las Palmas Match 1995).
How to Reassess Your Chess Workbook, p. 270} 1. Nd1 *


[Event "Test 11"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r1b3k1/pp1n3p/2pbpq1r/3p4/2PPp1p1/PP2P1P1/1BQN1P1P/3RRBK1 b - - bm Rxh2

{BLACK TO MOVE: 17...Rxh2!! Black could have continued the attack slowly,
for example by 17...Nf8 18.Bg2 Bd7 19.Nf1 Rg6, intending ...h5 and
then...Nh7-g5-f3, but Tartakower's judgment is excellent. The sacrifice
presents White with enormous practical problems, and analysis shows that Black
retains the advantage even against perfect defense.
(Maroczy-Tartakower,Teplitz-Schonau 1922). The World's Greatest Chess Games,
p. 104} Rxh2 *


[Event "Test 12"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r1bq1rk1/p4ppp/1pnp1n2/2p5/2PPpP2/1NP1P3/P3B1PP/R1BQ1RK1 b - - bm Qd7

{BLACK TO MOVE: 12...Qd7!! This move, together with the subsequent
queen manoeuvre, astounded the chess world at the time it was played, but its
concept has been an inspiration to many grandmasters since. Nimzowitsch's main
idea was first to restrain, then blockade and finally destroy. Here Black
starts the restraining part of the plan. (Johner-Nimzowitsch, Dresden 1926).
The World's Greatest Chess games, p. 142} Qd7 *


[Event "Test 13"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r2r2k1/ppq2pbp/3p1np1/4p3/2b1PP2/1PN1BB2/P1PQ2PP/2R1R1K1 b - - bm d5

{BLACK TO MOVE: 16...d5!! It is always nice to be able to play a move like
this - there are four pieces trying to stop this advance, yet Black can play
it. Moreover, the move creates such serious threats that Black need not move
his attacked bishop for now. (Rauzer-Botvinnik, USSR Championship, Leningrad
1933)The World's Greatest Chess Games, p. 159} d5 *


[Event "Test 14"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]8/p3q1kp/1p2Pnp1/3pQ3/2pP4/1nP3N1/1B4PP/6K1 w - - bm Ba3

{WHITE TO MOVE: 30.Ba3!! There are two ideas behind this move: to remove
the blockader from in front of the e-pawn and to divert the queen from
defending the f6-knight. (Botvinnik-Capablanca, AVRO Tournament, Rotterdam
1938). TheWorld's Greatest Chess Games, p. 165} 1. Ba3 *


[Event "Test 15"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r1b2r1k/4qp1p/p2ppb1Q/4nP2/1p1NP3/2N5/PPP4P/2KR1BR1 w - - bm Nc6

{WHITE TO MOVE: 18.Nc6!! A truly incredible sacrifice. The logic is
that Black's kingside is hanging by a thread, but this state of affairs will
exist for only one move. If Black could play ...Bb7 and ...Rg8 then he would
have alarge advantage thanks to his two active bishops. Thus White must take
instant action and the point of this sacrifice is simply to remove the knight
from e5 for a moment. Analysis shows that White gains the advantage in every
line. (Kholmov-Bronstein, USSR Championship, Kiev 1964). TEST 15 is found in
"The World's Greatest Chess Games," p. 294.} 1. Nc6 *

[Event "Test 16"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]3k3r/p1p2p2/1N6/7p/8/3P4/PP4K1/R7 b - - bm cxb6


{BLACK TO MOVE: 28...cxb6!! "To win, Black needs to penetrate with his king
to the queenside without allowing White to reduce the number of pawns with the
plan a4-a5." Sowray. Thus 28...axb6 29.a4 intending a5 should be sufficient
for White to hold the draw. (Estrin-Berliner, 5th Correspondence World
Championship 1965-8). The World's Greatest Chess Games.} cxb6 *


[Event "Test 17"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]3q1rk1/pb3Np1/1p6/3pPQ1P/2r5/8/Pn3PP1/3RR1K1 w - - bm e6

{WHITE TO MOVE: 25.e6!! White now threatens 26.e7 and 26.Nxd8. The move is
far better than 25 Nxd8? Rxf5 26.e6 Bc8 27.e7 Bd7, when Black stops the pawn
at the cost of a "mere" bishop. (Polugaevsky-Tal, USSR Championship, Moscow
1969). The World's Greatest Chess Games, p. 327} 1. e6 *


[Event "Test 18"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r3kb1r/4Pp2/pn3P2/1pp3B1/2p5/2N3P1/PP3P1P/3RKB1b w - - bm h4

{WHITE TO MOVE: 17.h4!! Polugaevsky had cooked up this astonishing idea in
his "laboratory" at home. 17.exf8=Q gives black the better chances
in Beliavsky-Bagirov, Moscow 1981. (Polugaevsky-Torre, Moscow 1981). The
World's Greatest Chess Games, p. 412.} 1. h4 *


[Event "Test 19"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]4rrk1/1bqn1pbn/p5pp/2pPp3/NpP2P2/1P2B1NP/P2Q1RB1/5RK1 w - - bm f5

WHITE TO MOVE: 1.f5!! Five points for the thematic 23 f5! with a bonus of one if you planned to meet 23…g5 with 24 Ne4. The threats of f5-f6, Nxc5 and d5-d6 ensure that White will have an advantage after getting the pawn back. (Franco-Colovic, Saint Vincent 2000, Multiple Choice Chess, p. 114) 1. f5!!



[Event "Test 20"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]8/8/p2k1p2/1p1p3p/1P1P3p/P3NPP1/5K2/1b6 w - - bm Ng2

{WHITE TO MOVE: 47.Ng2!! By sacrificing a pawn, White makes certain that
his king will have a route into Black's position. Together with the fact
that Black's bishop is now very "bad", this is quite enough to seal Black's
fate. Instead 47.gxh4 would leave White with no real winning
prospects.(Karpov-Kasparov, World Championship Match (Game 9), Moscow
1984/85). The World's Greatest Chess games, p. 426} 1. Ng2 *

[Event "Test 21"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r3n3/3b2kp/1qNp2p1/1p1Pp2n/1P2Pp2/3B1N1P/1Q3PP1/2R3K1 w - - bm Rc5

{WHITE TO MOVE: 36.Rc5!! The obvious sacrifice is 36.Nfxe5 dxe5 37.Nxe5,
but this is refuted by 37...Qf6. Instead Tal combines his queenside play
against the b-pawn with tactics along the long diagonal. (Tal-Hjartarson,
Reykjavik 1987). The World's Greatest Chess Games, p. 460} 1. Rc5 *


[Event "Test 22"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r1b2r1k/ppp1q1pp/2n1pb2/2P5/2BPpp2/P3PPB1/1PQ3PP/2KR2NR w - - bm Qxe4

{WHITE TO MOVE: 14.Qxe4!! This brilliant piece sacrifice kills Black's
attempt at snatching the initiative. (Steinitz-Lasker, St Petersburg 1895/6).
The World's Greatest Chess Games, p. 47.} 1. Qxe4 *


[Event "Test 23"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]2r2k2/pb3p2/q6r/2pp4/n1p2P2/N5P1/PPQ3BP/2KR3R b - - bm c3

{BLACK TO MOVE: 22...c3!! "Perhaps the most difficult move of the
game."(Shirov). He perceives that 22...Rb6 23 Qh7 gives real counterplay,
whereas the game continuation, although hair-raising, only gives White visual
counterplay.(Kamsky-Shirov, World team Championship, Lucerne 1993). The
World's Greatest Chess Games, p. 499} c3 *

[Event "Test 24"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r2qkb1r/1b2np1p/p2pp3/4n1P1/1p2P1P1/1N2B3/PPP1N1QP/R3KB1R b - - bm h5

{BLACK TO MOVE: 13...h5!! Far better than 13...Nc4 14.Bd4 e5 15.Ng3!,
when White's pieces suddenly find some coordination. A key move breaking open
lines on the kingside. (Shirov-Polgar, Sicilian theme Tournament, Buenos Aires
1994). The World's Greatest Chess Games, p. 510.} h5 *

[Event "Test 25"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2003.11.01"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r3kb1r/2p3pp/p1n1p3/1pn1P3/8/2q5/P1BN1PPP/R1BQ1RK1 w - - bm Nb3

{WHITE TO MOVE: 15.Nb3!! This was bashed out instantly by the defending
champion. Anand pondered for a full 45 minutes before making the most obvious
reply. (Kasparov-Anand, PCA World Championship Match (Game 10), New York
1995). The World's Greatest Chess Games, p. 520.} *


3rk2r/p4pRp/4p3/q1pPn3/1pP5/4p2B/PQ2KP1P/2R5 b - - bm Rxd5
8/5p1p/1p2pPk1/p1p1P3/P1P1K2b/4B3/1P5P/8 w - - bm b4
3r2k1/1ppr3p/p2p1p2/4pNbR/2P1P1P1/1PP3P1/P4PK1/3R4 w - - bm Rhh1
1r1q1rk1/2p1bppp/p5b1/3pP3/Bn1Pn3/2N1BN1P/1P2QPP1/R2R2K1 w - - bm Na2
r5k1/1b1n2q1/pp1p3p/1p1Pp1p1/5r2/2P1N2P/PPB2PP1/R2QR1K1 w - - bm a4
2rq1rk1/pb1nbpp1/5n1p/2pp4/5B2/2N1PN2/PPQ1BPPP/R2R2K1 w - - bm a4
r3r1k1/p1q2ppp/2p1pn2/3p1b2/1Q1P4/1PP2N1P/P4PP1/R3KB1R b - - bm e5
3qrbk1/3b1pp1/p2p1n1p/2pP4/nrP1P3/3B2NP/P1QB2PN/1R2R1K1 b - - bm Qc7
r1b2rk1/pp3p1p/4pBp1/5q2/3P3Q/4K1R1/P4P1P/R7 b - - bm e5
2r1r1k1/1b2qp1n/3p2p1/1ppP3p/1n2P3/1P2NN1P/3Q1PP1/RB2R1K1 w - - bm Nd1
r1b3k1/pp1n3p/2pbpq1r/3p4/2PPp1p1/PP2P1P1/1BQN1P1P/3RRBK1 b - - bm Rxh2
r1bq1rk1/p4ppp/1pnp1n2/2p5/2PPpP2/1NP1P3/P3B1PP/R1BQ1RK1 b - - bm Qd7
r2r2k1/ppq2pbp/3p1np1/4p3/2b1PP2/1PN1BB2/P1PQ2PP/2R1R1K1 b - - bm d5
8/p3q1kp/1p2Pnp1/3pQ3/2pP4/1nP3N1/1B4PP/6K1 w - - bm Ba3
r1b2r1k/4qp1p/p2ppb1Q/4nP2/1p1NP3/2N5/PPP4P/2KR1BR1 w - - bm Nc6
3k3r/p1p2p2/1N6/7p/8/3P4/PP4K1/R7 b - - bm cxb6
3q1rk1/pb3Np1/1p6/3pPQ1P/2r5/8/Pn3PP1/3RR1K1 w - - bm e6
r3kb1r/4Pp2/pn3P2/1pp3B1/2p5/2N3P1/PP3P1P/3RKB1b w - - bm h4
4rrk1/1bqn1pbn/p5pp/2pPp3/NpP2P2/1P2B1NP/P2Q1RB1/5RK1 w - - bm f5
8/8/p2k1p2/1p1p3p/1P1P3p/P3NPP1/5K2/1b6 w - - bm Ng2
r3n3/3b2kp/1qNp2p1/1p1Pp2n/1P2Pp2/3B1N1P/1Q3PP1/2R3K1 w - - bm Rc5
r1b2r1k/ppp1q1pp/2n1pb2/2P5/2BPpp2/P3PPB1/1PQ3PP/2KR2NR w - - bm Qxe4
2r2k2/pb3p2/q6r/2pp4/n1p2P2/N5P1/PPQ3BP/2KR3R b - - bm c3
r2qkb1r/1b2np1p/p2pp3/4n1P1/1p2P1P1/1N2B3/PPP1N1QP/R3KB1R b - - bm h5
r3kb1r/2p3pp/p1n1p3/1pn1P3/8/2q5/P1BN1PPP/R1BQ1RK1 w - - bm Nb3

User avatar
Mike S.
Posts: 1466
Joined: Thu Mar 09, 2006 4:33 am

Re: BRILLIANCY TEST SUITE (2 min/move)

Post by Mike S. » Sun Oct 07, 2007 1:02 pm

Yes, Slow Chess Blitz WV 2.1 is a good engine, but it hasn't been updated for a long time now. It uses a couple of bitbases. On some computers (if run as an engine in another interface), it may be required to set Slow Chess to the engine option "low priority" to have it run smoothly. The speed isn't harmed by that, under normal conditions.

http://www.3dkingdoms.com/chess/slow.htm

I have a similar test suite, but I just noticed it's missing among my results. But I had selected it for a group of test opponents for my 'blitz prediction' tests. Various ratings indicate that it's strength is in between the older Tigers, GT 2.0 and CT 14 for comparison:

http://computerschach.twoday.net/stories/3279924/

Walter Eigenmann has a big test with 64 'avoid move' positions, and there Slow Chess scored good, solving 37/64 within one minute each, like Tiger 15 or Junior 9 did too (which were clearly faster though, in average).

http://www.beepworld.de/members38/eigen ... sstest.htm

A game example against the (old, by now) Alaric version 703:

[Event "Blivorix-05_Alarc703"]
[Site "Schrotty"]
[Date "2007.03.31"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Alaric 703"]
[Black "SlowChess Blitz WV2.1"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "E15"]
[PlyCount "61"]
[EventDate "2007.04.??"]
[EventType "blitz"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 b6 3. Nf3 e6 4. g3 Ba6 5. Qb3 Nc6 6. Nc3 Na5 7. Qa4 Bxc4 8. Ne5
Ba6 9. Bg2 Bb7 10. Bxb7 Nxb7 11. Bg5 h6 12. Bxf6 gxf6 13. Nf3 Rg8 14. O-O Nd6
15. Kh1 f5 16. Rad1 c6 17. Qb3 h5 18. Rd3 Be7 19. Ne5 h4 20. Re3 Bg5 21. Rf3
Qc7 22. a3 O-O-O 23. Rd3 Rg7 24. Qb4 Rh8 25. Qb3 f6 26. Nc4 Nxc4 27. Qxc4 hxg3
28. Rxg3 Rgh7 29. e3 Rxh2+ 30. Kg1 f4 31. Qe2 0-1

(But in general, I think these two are fairly equal in blitz)
Regards, Mike

bob
Posts: 20356
Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2006 6:30 pm
Location: Birmingham, AL

Re: BRILLIANCY TEST SUITE (2 min/move)

Post by bob » Sun Oct 07, 2007 7:58 pm

premio53 wrote:I've been out of chess for quite a while now and haven't kept up with the latest engines. I was laid off my job and started playing around again with various chess programs. I started running a few through a test suite I put together a few years ago and here a few of the results. The big surprise was "Slow Blitz." I had never heard of it and simply downloaded it by chance off some website. It scored better than both Crafty 20.14 and Arasan 10. I ran the tests on a Toshiba notebook with a 1733Mhz dual core processor and 1 gig RAM. Here are the tests that each program got right.

Slow Blitz 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 14, 16, 17,

Crafty 20.14 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10, 14, 17, 23
I ran this test on my 2.0ghz core-2 laptop and got the following:

Code: Select all

total positions searched..........          25
number right......................          15
number wrong......................          10
percentage right..................          60
percentage wrong..................          40
total nodes searched..............  6432497424
average search depth..............        14.1
nodes per second..................     4418470
total time........................       24:15
The correct ones were:1,2,3,4,5,7,9,12,14,16,1719,21,23,24

Arasan 10 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, 10, 14, 17, 23, 25

I love the GUI that comes with Slow Blitz and wish Jon Dart and other programmers would provide a little more polished interface with theirs. I believe more people would use them more as a result of that. Slow Blitz may well replace my beloved Genius program which seems to have died in the mind of Richard Lang. I would be interested in how some of the commercial programs do in solving some of these problems. It's been a while since I tried to post a diagram so these may not work. Regards.

BRILLIANCY TEST SUITE (2 min/move)

[Event "Test 1"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]3rk2r/p4pRp/4p3/q1pPn3/1pP5/4p2B/PQ2KP1P/2R5 b - - bm Rxd5

{ BLACK TO MOVE: 20...Rxd5!! A spectactular sacrifice to open a line for
the queen toward the White king. (Fedorowitz-Shamkovich, New York 1981)
The Mammouth Book of Chess p. 218} Rxd5 *


[Event "Test 2"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]8/5p1p/1p2pPk1/p1p1P3/P1P1K2b/4B3/1P5P/8 w - - bm b4


{WHITE TO MOVE: 1.b4!! White wins by using an interesting tactic designed to
clear the way for the a4-pawn's advance. It's based on the fact that
Black's queenside pawns are resting on dark squares, thus making them
vulnerable to attack by White's Bishop. (Smyslov-Yastrebov, Moscow 1936). How
to Reassess Your Chess Workbook, p. 326} 1. b4 *


[Event "Test 3"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]3r2k1/1ppr3p/p2p1p2/4pNbR/2P1P1P1/1PP3P1/P4PK1/3R4 w - - bm Rhh1

{WHITE TO MOVE: 1.Rhh1!! The subtle point of White's play. By
forcing...f7-f6, White has taken away a route of retreat from the Black
Bishop. White now intends to win the bishop with Rhf1 and f4. There is no
defense against this threat. "How to Reassess Your Chess Workbook", p. 376} 1.
Rhh1 *


[Event "Test 4"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]1r1q1rk1/2p1bppp/p5b1/3pP3/Bn1Pn3/2N1BN1P/1P2QPP1/R2R2K1 w - - bm Na2

{WHITE TO MOVE: 1.Na2!! We reach a position that was once thought to be
allright for Black. However, a new move was unveiled that cut to the heart of
the position and showed that White is actually clearly better.
(Short-Karpov,Linares Match 1992). How to Reassess Your Chess Workbook, p.
125} 1. Na2 *


[Event "Test 5"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r5k1/1b1n2q1/pp1p3p/1p1Pp1p1/5r2/2P1N2P/PPB2PP1/R2QR1K1 w - - bm a4

{WHITE TO MOVE: 1.a4!! A very deep move. The idea is to force an exchange
of one pair of Rooks after 1...bxa4 2.Rxa4. This in turn, will give
White permanent control over the f5-square. Anand points out that neither
1.Bf5 Rf82.Be6+ Kh8 nor 1.g3 Rf6 2.Bf5 Raf8 gives White much.TEST 5 is a game
from Anand-Kamsky, Las Palmas Match 1995 in "How to Reassess Your Chess
Workbook," p. 211. } 1. a4 *


[Event "Test 6"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]2rq1rk1/pb1nbpp1/5n1p/2pp4/5B2/2N1PN2/PPQ1BPPP/R2R2K1 w - - bm a4

{WHITE TO MOVE: 1.a4!! Portisch made the comment "What move is this? He's
just weakening his queenside. Is that really so? Oh no, he's starting to push
the pawn to a5 where it will take the important b6-square from my Knight."
Black figured out the first point of a2-a4: if the pawn can get to a5 it
will severely restrict the movements of the Black Queen and make b6
in accessible to the d7-Knight. TEST 6 is a game from Kasparov-L. Portisch,
OHRA 1986 in "How to Reassess Your Chess Workbook," p. 228.} 1. a4 *

[Event "Test 7"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r3r1k1/p1q2ppp/2p1pn2/3p1b2/1Q1P4/1PP2N1P/P4PP1/R3KB1R b - - bm e5

{BLACK TO MOVE: 1...e5!! Ripping the center open so that the Black army
can reach the centrally placed White King. 1...Rab8 is possible as long as
you thought that this move made the following ...e5 advance even stronger
(it actually forces the White Queen to run to a better square). How to
Reassess Your Chess Workbook, p. 250} e5 *


[Event "Test 8"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]3qrbk1/3b1pp1/p2p1n1p/2pP4/nrP1P3/3B2NP/P1QB2PN/1R2R1K1 b - - bm Qc7

{BLACK TO MOVE: 1...Qc7!! This fine move gives up the Exchange for
several positional plusses. By making this sacrifice, Black gives himself
something to play with. Of course, he could have retained material equality by
1...Rxb1, but then every advantage would have been on the opponent's side. No
self-respecting grandmaster would accept such a dismal state of affairs!
(Tal-Gligoric,Candidates' Quarter Final Match 1968). How to Reassess Your
Chess Workbook, p.258} Qc7 *


[Event "Test 9"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r1b2rk1/pp3p1p/4pBp1/5q2/3P3Q/4K1R1/P4P1P/R7 b - - bm e5

{BLACK TO MOVE: 1...e5!! Black is two pawns up and doesn't have to worry
about giving one back. Thus, for the small price of one tiny pawn, Black opens
up the center (White's King is far from happy there!) and frees the Bishop on
c8.(Thomas-Williams, San Francisco 1996). How to Reassess Your Chess Workbook
TEST 9 is found on p. 260 in "How to Reassess Your Chess Workbook."} e5 *

[Event "Test 10"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]2r1r1k1/1b2qp1n/3p2p1/1ppP3p/1n2P3/1P2NN1P/3Q1PP1/RB2R1K1 w - - bm Nd1

{WHITE TO MOVE: 1.Nd1!! The best move without a doubt. White's Knight
retreat,though odd looking, stops Black's ...Ng5 (White's Queen now hits that
square) and prepares to swing the Knight around to c3 where it takes aim at
Black's loose pawn on b5. Black can save his pawn by moving his b4-Knight and
pushing the b-pawn to b4, but that leaves a once-active Knight on a poor
square, and also creates a hole on c4. (Anand-Kamsky, Las Palmas Match 1995).
How to Reassess Your Chess Workbook, p. 270} 1. Nd1 *


[Event "Test 11"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r1b3k1/pp1n3p/2pbpq1r/3p4/2PPp1p1/PP2P1P1/1BQN1P1P/3RRBK1 b - - bm Rxh2

{BLACK TO MOVE: 17...Rxh2!! Black could have continued the attack slowly,
for example by 17...Nf8 18.Bg2 Bd7 19.Nf1 Rg6, intending ...h5 and
then...Nh7-g5-f3, but Tartakower's judgment is excellent. The sacrifice
presents White with enormous practical problems, and analysis shows that Black
retains the advantage even against perfect defense.
(Maroczy-Tartakower,Teplitz-Schonau 1922). The World's Greatest Chess Games,
p. 104} Rxh2 *


[Event "Test 12"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r1bq1rk1/p4ppp/1pnp1n2/2p5/2PPpP2/1NP1P3/P3B1PP/R1BQ1RK1 b - - bm Qd7

{BLACK TO MOVE: 12...Qd7!! This move, together with the subsequent
queen manoeuvre, astounded the chess world at the time it was played, but its
concept has been an inspiration to many grandmasters since. Nimzowitsch's main
idea was first to restrain, then blockade and finally destroy. Here Black
starts the restraining part of the plan. (Johner-Nimzowitsch, Dresden 1926).
The World's Greatest Chess games, p. 142} Qd7 *


[Event "Test 13"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r2r2k1/ppq2pbp/3p1np1/4p3/2b1PP2/1PN1BB2/P1PQ2PP/2R1R1K1 b - - bm d5

{BLACK TO MOVE: 16...d5!! It is always nice to be able to play a move like
this - there are four pieces trying to stop this advance, yet Black can play
it. Moreover, the move creates such serious threats that Black need not move
his attacked bishop for now. (Rauzer-Botvinnik, USSR Championship, Leningrad
1933)The World's Greatest Chess Games, p. 159} d5 *


[Event "Test 14"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]8/p3q1kp/1p2Pnp1/3pQ3/2pP4/1nP3N1/1B4PP/6K1 w - - bm Ba3

{WHITE TO MOVE: 30.Ba3!! There are two ideas behind this move: to remove
the blockader from in front of the e-pawn and to divert the queen from
defending the f6-knight. (Botvinnik-Capablanca, AVRO Tournament, Rotterdam
1938). TheWorld's Greatest Chess Games, p. 165} 1. Ba3 *


[Event "Test 15"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r1b2r1k/4qp1p/p2ppb1Q/4nP2/1p1NP3/2N5/PPP4P/2KR1BR1 w - - bm Nc6

{WHITE TO MOVE: 18.Nc6!! A truly incredible sacrifice. The logic is
that Black's kingside is hanging by a thread, but this state of affairs will
exist for only one move. If Black could play ...Bb7 and ...Rg8 then he would
have alarge advantage thanks to his two active bishops. Thus White must take
instant action and the point of this sacrifice is simply to remove the knight
from e5 for a moment. Analysis shows that White gains the advantage in every
line. (Kholmov-Bronstein, USSR Championship, Kiev 1964). TEST 15 is found in
"The World's Greatest Chess Games," p. 294.} 1. Nc6 *

[Event "Test 16"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]3k3r/p1p2p2/1N6/7p/8/3P4/PP4K1/R7 b - - bm cxb6


{BLACK TO MOVE: 28...cxb6!! "To win, Black needs to penetrate with his king
to the queenside without allowing White to reduce the number of pawns with the
plan a4-a5." Sowray. Thus 28...axb6 29.a4 intending a5 should be sufficient
for White to hold the draw. (Estrin-Berliner, 5th Correspondence World
Championship 1965-8). The World's Greatest Chess Games.} cxb6 *


[Event "Test 17"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]3q1rk1/pb3Np1/1p6/3pPQ1P/2r5/8/Pn3PP1/3RR1K1 w - - bm e6

{WHITE TO MOVE: 25.e6!! White now threatens 26.e7 and 26.Nxd8. The move is
far better than 25 Nxd8? Rxf5 26.e6 Bc8 27.e7 Bd7, when Black stops the pawn
at the cost of a "mere" bishop. (Polugaevsky-Tal, USSR Championship, Moscow
1969). The World's Greatest Chess Games, p. 327} 1. e6 *


[Event "Test 18"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r3kb1r/4Pp2/pn3P2/1pp3B1/2p5/2N3P1/PP3P1P/3RKB1b w - - bm h4

{WHITE TO MOVE: 17.h4!! Polugaevsky had cooked up this astonishing idea in
his "laboratory" at home. 17.exf8=Q gives black the better chances
in Beliavsky-Bagirov, Moscow 1981. (Polugaevsky-Torre, Moscow 1981). The
World's Greatest Chess Games, p. 412.} 1. h4 *


[Event "Test 19"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]4rrk1/1bqn1pbn/p5pp/2pPp3/NpP2P2/1P2B1NP/P2Q1RB1/5RK1 w - - bm f5

WHITE TO MOVE: 1.f5!! Five points for the thematic 23 f5! with a bonus of one if you planned to meet 23…g5 with 24 Ne4. The threats of f5-f6, Nxc5 and d5-d6 ensure that White will have an advantage after getting the pawn back. (Franco-Colovic, Saint Vincent 2000, Multiple Choice Chess, p. 114) 1. f5!!



[Event "Test 20"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]8/8/p2k1p2/1p1p3p/1P1P3p/P3NPP1/5K2/1b6 w - - bm Ng2

{WHITE TO MOVE: 47.Ng2!! By sacrificing a pawn, White makes certain that
his king will have a route into Black's position. Together with the fact
that Black's bishop is now very "bad", this is quite enough to seal Black's
fate. Instead 47.gxh4 would leave White with no real winning
prospects.(Karpov-Kasparov, World Championship Match (Game 9), Moscow
1984/85). The World's Greatest Chess games, p. 426} 1. Ng2 *

[Event "Test 21"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r3n3/3b2kp/1qNp2p1/1p1Pp2n/1P2Pp2/3B1N1P/1Q3PP1/2R3K1 w - - bm Rc5

{WHITE TO MOVE: 36.Rc5!! The obvious sacrifice is 36.Nfxe5 dxe5 37.Nxe5,
but this is refuted by 37...Qf6. Instead Tal combines his queenside play
against the b-pawn with tactics along the long diagonal. (Tal-Hjartarson,
Reykjavik 1987). The World's Greatest Chess Games, p. 460} 1. Rc5 *


[Event "Test 22"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r1b2r1k/ppp1q1pp/2n1pb2/2P5/2BPpp2/P3PPB1/1PQ3PP/2KR2NR w - - bm Qxe4

{WHITE TO MOVE: 14.Qxe4!! This brilliant piece sacrifice kills Black's
attempt at snatching the initiative. (Steinitz-Lasker, St Petersburg 1895/6).
The World's Greatest Chess Games, p. 47.} 1. Qxe4 *


[Event "Test 23"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]2r2k2/pb3p2/q6r/2pp4/n1p2P2/N5P1/PPQ3BP/2KR3R b - - bm c3

{BLACK TO MOVE: 22...c3!! "Perhaps the most difficult move of the
game."(Shirov). He perceives that 22...Rb6 23 Qh7 gives real counterplay,
whereas the game continuation, although hair-raising, only gives White visual
counterplay.(Kamsky-Shirov, World team Championship, Lucerne 1993). The
World's Greatest Chess Games, p. 499} c3 *

[Event "Test 24"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "0000.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r2qkb1r/1b2np1p/p2pp3/4n1P1/1p2P1P1/1N2B3/PPP1N1QP/R3KB1R b - - bm h5

{BLACK TO MOVE: 13...h5!! Far better than 13...Nc4 14.Bd4 e5 15.Ng3!,
when White's pieces suddenly find some coordination. A key move breaking open
lines on the kingside. (Shirov-Polgar, Sicilian theme Tournament, Buenos Aires
1994). The World's Greatest Chess Games, p. 510.} h5 *

[Event "Test 25"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2003.11.01"]
[Round "?"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[d]r3kb1r/2p3pp/p1n1p3/1pn1P3/8/2q5/P1BN1PPP/R1BQ1RK1 w - - bm Nb3

{WHITE TO MOVE: 15.Nb3!! This was bashed out instantly by the defending
champion. Anand pondered for a full 45 minutes before making the most obvious
reply. (Kasparov-Anand, PCA World Championship Match (Game 10), New York
1995). The World's Greatest Chess Games, p. 520.} *


3rk2r/p4pRp/4p3/q1pPn3/1pP5/4p2B/PQ2KP1P/2R5 b - - bm Rxd5
8/5p1p/1p2pPk1/p1p1P3/P1P1K2b/4B3/1P5P/8 w - - bm b4
3r2k1/1ppr3p/p2p1p2/4pNbR/2P1P1P1/1PP3P1/P4PK1/3R4 w - - bm Rhh1
1r1q1rk1/2p1bppp/p5b1/3pP3/Bn1Pn3/2N1BN1P/1P2QPP1/R2R2K1 w - - bm Na2
r5k1/1b1n2q1/pp1p3p/1p1Pp1p1/5r2/2P1N2P/PPB2PP1/R2QR1K1 w - - bm a4
2rq1rk1/pb1nbpp1/5n1p/2pp4/5B2/2N1PN2/PPQ1BPPP/R2R2K1 w - - bm a4
r3r1k1/p1q2ppp/2p1pn2/3p1b2/1Q1P4/1PP2N1P/P4PP1/R3KB1R b - - bm e5
3qrbk1/3b1pp1/p2p1n1p/2pP4/nrP1P3/3B2NP/P1QB2PN/1R2R1K1 b - - bm Qc7
r1b2rk1/pp3p1p/4pBp1/5q2/3P3Q/4K1R1/P4P1P/R7 b - - bm e5
2r1r1k1/1b2qp1n/3p2p1/1ppP3p/1n2P3/1P2NN1P/3Q1PP1/RB2R1K1 w - - bm Nd1
r1b3k1/pp1n3p/2pbpq1r/3p4/2PPp1p1/PP2P1P1/1BQN1P1P/3RRBK1 b - - bm Rxh2
r1bq1rk1/p4ppp/1pnp1n2/2p5/2PPpP2/1NP1P3/P3B1PP/R1BQ1RK1 b - - bm Qd7
r2r2k1/ppq2pbp/3p1np1/4p3/2b1PP2/1PN1BB2/P1PQ2PP/2R1R1K1 b - - bm d5
8/p3q1kp/1p2Pnp1/3pQ3/2pP4/1nP3N1/1B4PP/6K1 w - - bm Ba3
r1b2r1k/4qp1p/p2ppb1Q/4nP2/1p1NP3/2N5/PPP4P/2KR1BR1 w - - bm Nc6
3k3r/p1p2p2/1N6/7p/8/3P4/PP4K1/R7 b - - bm cxb6
3q1rk1/pb3Np1/1p6/3pPQ1P/2r5/8/Pn3PP1/3RR1K1 w - - bm e6
r3kb1r/4Pp2/pn3P2/1pp3B1/2p5/2N3P1/PP3P1P/3RKB1b w - - bm h4
4rrk1/1bqn1pbn/p5pp/2pPp3/NpP2P2/1P2B1NP/P2Q1RB1/5RK1 w - - bm f5
8/8/p2k1p2/1p1p3p/1P1P3p/P3NPP1/5K2/1b6 w - - bm Ng2
r3n3/3b2kp/1qNp2p1/1p1Pp2n/1P2Pp2/3B1N1P/1Q3PP1/2R3K1 w - - bm Rc5
r1b2r1k/ppp1q1pp/2n1pb2/2P5/2BPpp2/P3PPB1/1PQ3PP/2KR2NR w - - bm Qxe4
2r2k2/pb3p2/q6r/2pp4/n1p2P2/N5P1/PPQ3BP/2KR3R b - - bm c3
r2qkb1r/1b2np1p/p2pp3/4n1P1/1p2P1P1/1N2B3/PPP1N1QP/R3KB1R b - - bm h5
r3kb1r/2p3pp/p1n1p3/1pn1P3/8/2q5/P1BN1PPP/R1BQ1RK1 w - - bm Nb3

jdart
Posts: 3572
Joined: Fri Mar 10, 2006 4:23 am
Location: http://www.arasanchess.org

Re: BRILLIANCY TEST SUITE (2 min/move)

Post by jdart » Sun Oct 07, 2007 11:02 pm

Have you verified that the key move in each case is uniquely best? I usually run a 1 or 2 hour/move search with best and 2 next best variations, to verify test moves.

--Jon

premio53

Re: BRILLIANCY TEST SUITE (2 min/move)

Post by premio53 » Mon Oct 08, 2007 12:31 am

jdart wrote:Have you verified that the key move in each case is uniquely best? I usually run a 1 or 2 hour/move search with best and 2 next best variations, to verify test moves.

--Jon
I may do that sometime but all the moves I believe were computer checked with the analysis. Obviously one would have to be a Grandmaster or International Master to really verify some of these positions. I ran the tests in the Chessmaster 9000 GUI so I don't know if that may be the reason for different results with Robert Hyatt. Arasan and Crafty are both great programs though.

I mentioned it would be nice to have a GUI with Arasan that was a little more sophisticated. Maybe the ability to paste PGN and FEN files and possibly even the ability to add Winboard or UCI engines. With so many engines out there, that would be an excellent way to allow your program to stand out among the crowd. If Arasan had something similar to Chess Genius the world would come to your door. Maybe even charge a small shareware fee. Even to this day I don't even try to mess with Winboard. Once again I believe Arasan and Crafty are great programs. Regards.

jdart
Posts: 3572
Joined: Fri Mar 10, 2006 4:23 am
Location: http://www.arasanchess.org

Re: BRILLIANCY TEST SUITE (2 min/move)

Post by jdart » Mon Oct 08, 2007 12:53 am

I am aware the Arasan GUI is not the world's greatest. I am thinking about re-doing it with the newer GDI+ toolkit and improving the looks, such as getting the pieces to anti-alias properly. But so far I have chosen to spend most time on the engine. Arasan works with Arena and Winboard, so those are alternatives for user interface.

--Jon

premio53

Re: BRILLIANCY TEST SUITE (2 min/move)

Post by premio53 » Mon Oct 08, 2007 1:44 am

premio53 wrote:
jdart wrote:Have you verified that the key move in each case is uniquely best? I usually run a 1 or 2 hour/move search with best and 2 next best variations, to verify test moves.

--Jon
I may do that sometime but all the moves I believe were computer checked with the analysis. Obviously one would have to be a Grandmaster or International Master to really verify some of these positions. I ran the tests in the Chessmaster 9000 GUI so I don't know if that may be the reason for different results with Robert Hyatt. Arasan and Crafty are both great programs though.

I mentioned it would be nice to have a GUI with Arasan that was a little more sophisticated. Maybe the ability to paste PGN and FEN files and possibly even the ability to add Winboard or UCI engines. With so many engines out there, that would be an excellent way to allow your program to stand out among the crowd. If Arasan had something similar to Chess Genius the world would come to your door. Maybe even charge a small shareware fee. Even to this day I don't even try to mess with Winboard. Once again I believe Arasan and Crafty are great programs. Regards.
How long should one allow an engine to run with the Arasan7 test suite? I may run a few programs with that set.

premio53

Re: BRILLIANCY TEST SUITE (2 min/move)

Post by premio53 » Mon Oct 08, 2007 1:48 am

premio53 wrote:
premio53 wrote:
jdart wrote:Have you verified that the key move in each case is uniquely best? I usually run a 1 or 2 hour/move search with best and 2 next best variations, to verify test moves.

--Jon
I may do that sometime but all the moves I believe were computer checked with the analysis. Obviously one would have to be a Grandmaster or International Master to really verify some of these positions. I ran the tests in the Chessmaster 9000 GUI so I don't know if that may be the reason for different results with Robert Hyatt. Arasan and Crafty are both great programs though.

I mentioned it would be nice to have a GUI with Arasan that was a little more sophisticated. Maybe the ability to paste PGN and FEN files and possibly even the ability to add Winboard or UCI engines. With so many engines out there, that would be an excellent way to allow your program to stand out among the crowd. If Arasan had something similar to Chess Genius the world would come to your door. Maybe even charge a small shareware fee. Even to this day I don't even try to mess with Winboard. Once again I believe Arasan and Crafty are great programs. Regards.
How long should one allow an engine to run with the Arasan7 test suite? I may run a few programs with that set.
Sorry! I had downloaded the test suites from your site some time ago and forgot that the times were listed there but not with the download. Regards.

jdart
Posts: 3572
Joined: Fri Mar 10, 2006 4:23 am
Location: http://www.arasanchess.org

Re: BRILLIANCY TEST SUITE (2 min/move)

Post by jdart » Mon Oct 08, 2007 3:04 am

> How long should one allow an engine to run with the Arasan7 test suite? I may run a few programs with that set.

I use 60 seconds/move.

--Jon

Dann Corbit
Posts: 8844
Joined: Wed Mar 08, 2006 7:57 pm
Location: Redmond, WA USA
Contact:

Re: BRILLIANCY TEST SUITE (2 min/move)

Post by Dann Corbit » Tue Oct 09, 2007 2:41 am

Some of the scores are not very convincing. In several cases the key move was chosen and later rejected.

Code: Select all

Analysis from c:\epd\bril.epd   
Analyzing engine: Hiarcs11.2SPUCI
10/8/2007 6:50:00 PM Level: 120 Seconds
0 of 1 matching moves
10/8/2007 6:50:03 PM, Total time: 12:00:03 AM Rated time: 00:00 = 0 Seconds
  1) Nc3-a2             Nc3-a2  * 58 Seconds
  2) Ne3-d1             Ne3-c2   
  3) .. c4-c3           Rc8-b8   
  4) a2-a4              Nf3-e5   
  5) .. c7xb6           c7xb6   * 6 Seconds
  6) e5-e6              e5-e6   * 1 Second
  7) .. Qd8-c7          Rb4xb1   
  8) Rh5-h1             Rh5-h1  * 1 Second
  9) .. Rd8xd5          Rd8xd5  * 17 Seconds
 10) f4-f5              f4-f5   * 72 Seconds
 11) b2-b4              b2-b4   * 4 Seconds
 12) Ne3-g2             g3xh4    
 13) Bb2-a3             Bb2-a3  * 5 Seconds
 14) Nd4-c6             Nc3-e2   
 15) Qc2xe4             Bg3xf4   
 16) .. e6-e5           e6-e5   * 2 Seconds
 17) .. Rh6xh2          Qf6-f5   
 18) .. Qd8-d7          Qd8-d7  * 32 Seconds
 19) .. h7-h5           h7-h5   * 1 Second
 20) .. d6-d5           Bc4-a6   
 21) Nd2-b3             Nd2-b3  * 30 Seconds
 22) h2-h4              e7xf8R   
 23) Rc1-c5             Nf3xe5   
 24) .. e6-e5           e6-e5   * 118 Seconds
 25) a2-a4              Ne3-f5   
13 of 25 matching moves
10/8/2007 7:40:22 PM, Total time: 12:50:22 AM Rated time: 29:47 = 1787 Seconds

Post Reply