New testsuite: King's Indian Mar del Plata

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Jeroen
Posts: 501
Joined: Wed Mar 08, 2006 8:49 pm

New testsuite: King's Indian Mar del Plata

Post by Jeroen » Thu Jun 22, 2017 9:52 am

Hi all,

Inspired by Kotronias on the King's Indian, volume 3, Mar del Plata I, I have made a testsuite with 50 critical positions in this line. Although the lines are long (sometimes even over 20 moves), most pieces are still on the board and thus they should lead to interesting, enterprising and complicated play.

Enjoy testing!

Download links:

http://www.mediafire.com/file/ha65v80ra ... a_2017.pgn

http://rybkaforum.net/cgi-bin/rybkaforu ... ?tid=32177

peter
Posts: 1656
Joined: Sat Feb 16, 2008 6:38 am
Full name: Peter Martan

Re: New testsuite: King's Indian Mar del Plata

Post by peter » Thu Jun 22, 2017 10:45 am

Thanks a lot, Jeroen
:!:
Peter.

User avatar
MikeGL
Posts: 796
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2011 12:49 pm

Re: New testsuite: King's Indian Mar del Plata

Post by MikeGL » Fri Jun 23, 2017 6:37 pm

Thanks a lot for this link.

This is one of my classic favorite a win by Kasparov.

[pgn]
[Event "Interpolis 13th"]
[Site "Tilburg NED"]
[Date "1989.09.24"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "8"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "Jeroen Piket"]
[Black "Garry Kasparov"]
[ECO "E99"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "56"]

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.c4 Bg7 4.Nc3 O-O 5.e4 d6 6.Be2 e5 7.O-O
Nc6 8.d5 Ne7 9.Ne1 Nd7 10.Be3 f5 11.f3 f4 12.Bf2 g5 13.b4 Nf6
14.c5 Ng6 15.cxd6 cxd6 16.Rc1 Rf7 17.a4 Bf8 18.a5 Bd7 19.Nb5
g4 20.Nc7 g3 21.Nxa8 Nh5 22.Kh1 gxf2 23.Rxf2 Ng3+ 24.Kg1 Qxa8
25.Bc4 a6 26.Qd3 Qa7 27.b5 axb5 28.Bxb5 Nh1 0-1
[/pgn]

But I don't mean to hijack this thread and post useless analysis with my weak hardware.

credit for the above game: http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1070485

Took the game from chessgames. I analyzed this game, which was published in a chess column in a newspaper, around 1990's before Fritz 2 even hit the market and intel i486 was very expensive. Strangely, the opening name at chessgames on above link is different
King's Indian Defense: Orthodox Variation. Classical System Neo-Classsical Line

The above game would be game 44 to 46 of your posted PGN. Again, thanks for this KID Mar Del Plata file.

BrendanJNorman
Posts: 1262
Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2016 11:43 pm
Full name: Brendan J Norman

Re: New testsuite: King's Indian Mar del Plata

Post by BrendanJNorman » Sat Jun 24, 2017 2:33 am

MikeGL wrote: Strangely, the opening name at chessgames on above link is different
King's Indian Defense: Orthodox Variation. Classical System Neo-Classsical Line
This is similar to how in the Ruy Lopez after 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 etc. some sources will call this the "Ruy Lopez, Morphy Defense" - while others will simply call it the "Main Line Ruy Lopez or Ruy Lopez Main Line or even simply Spanish Game"

The name as stated here is the equivalent of just saying KID Main Line because it literally is the Main Line - even though the Bayonet Attack even has had bouts of popularity over the years.

NOTE: I've noticed (and this may be related) that lower rated players tend to love citing long opening variation names - like "yeah, my favorite opening is the Sicilian Defense, Dragon Variation, Hazai Variation, Bronstein Gambit" (and I've even seen them start verbally reciting ALL the moves just in case the listener wasn't aware)

While stronger players in conversation will simply say "You know that Dragon line where you play h5, Rc5 and launch your queenside pawns?"

I think in the former case the lower rated guys are virtue signaling (in a way), while in the latter, the stronger players feel they have nothing to prove and are just trying to make the other side know which line they mean.

I've had students say to me "yeah man, I wanna work on the (insert weird opening name) this week" and I'm like "errr you'll have to explain what that is" and it turns out it's some well known opening.

Interesting nevertheless - don't worry too much about the opening names - just positions and ideas.

User avatar
MikeGL
Posts: 796
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2011 12:49 pm

Re: New testsuite: King's Indian Mar del Plata

Post by MikeGL » Sat Jun 24, 2017 4:31 am

BrendanJNorman wrote:
MikeGL wrote: Strangely, the opening name at chessgames on above link is different
King's Indian Defense: Orthodox Variation. Classical System Neo-Classsical Line
This is similar to how in the Ruy Lopez after 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 etc. some sources will call this the "Ruy Lopez, Morphy Defense" - while others will simply call it the "Main Line Ruy Lopez or Ruy Lopez Main Line or even simply Spanish Game"

The name as stated here is the equivalent of just saying KID Main Line because it literally is the Main Line - even though the Bayonet Attack even has had bouts of popularity over the years.

NOTE: I've noticed (and this may be related) that lower rated players tend to love citing long opening variation names - like "yeah, my favorite opening is the Sicilian Defense, Dragon Variation, Hazai Variation, Bronstein Gambit" (and I've even seen them start verbally reciting ALL the moves just in case the listener wasn't aware)

While stronger players in conversation will simply say "You know that Dragon line where you play h5, Rc5 and launch your queenside pawns?"

I think in the former case the lower rated guys are virtue signaling (in a way), while in the latter, the stronger players feel they have nothing to prove and are just trying to make the other side know which line they mean.

I've had students say to me "yeah man, I wanna work on the (insert weird opening name) this week" and I'm like "errr you'll have to explain what that is" and it turns out it's some well known opening.

Interesting nevertheless - don't worry too much about the opening names - just positions and ideas.
You are spot on. Actually I memorized the above K.I.D. game of Piket-Kasparov by heart because I was young at that time and electronic DB and engines were not yet that common around 1900's in a small province where I stay, so I kept on replaying the game and analyzing each line until I memorized the whole game. I showed the above game around 2003 to a good friend who was already an IM and he just whispered, "ah, Mar del Plata". Then he also mentioned Nd2 was actually stronger and more common than the text move Ne1 that was used by Piket.

-ps
Very easy to memorize that game of Kasparov because all moves were logical after the opening phase.

Jeroen
Posts: 501
Joined: Wed Mar 08, 2006 8:49 pm

Re: New testsuite: King's Indian Mar del Plata

Post by Jeroen » Sat Jun 24, 2017 5:56 am

Thanks, Mike. Indeed a great game by Kasparov.

The variation played by Piket is covered with positions 23 and 24 in the PGN:

[d]r2q2k1/ppNb1r1p/3p1nnb/P2Pp3/1P2P3/5PB1/4B1P1/2RQNRK1 w - - 0 23

[d]r2q1bk1/Np1b1r1p/1B1p1nn1/P2Pp3/1P2Pp2/5Pp1/4B1PP/2RQNRK1 b - - 0 21

beram
Posts: 1187
Joined: Wed Jan 06, 2010 2:11 pm

Re: New testsuite: King's Indian Mar del Plata

Post by beram » Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:48 am

Jeroen wrote:Thanks, Mike. Indeed a great game by Kasparov.

The variation played by Piket is covered with positions 23 and 24 in the PGN:

[d]r2q2k1/ppNb1r1p/3p1nnb/P2Pp3/1P2P3/5PB1/4B1P1/2RQNRK1 w - - 0 23

[d]r2q1bk1/Np1b1r1p/1B1p1nn1/P2Pp3/1P2Pp2/5Pp1/4B1PP/2RQNRK1 b - - 0 21
and this how the last fish and komodo played this last 24 position at blitz

[pgn]
[Event "K1101 - asmFish 220517 2x"]
[Site "I5-4200M @2500Mhz (Fritzmark4"]
[Date "2017.06.22"]
[Round "47"]
[White "Komodo 11.01 64-bit"]
[Black "asmFishW_2017-05-22_base"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "E99"]
[Annotator "0.04;-0.31"]
[PlyCount "76"]
[TimeControl "180+2"]

{Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-4200M CPU @ 2.50GHz 2494 MHz W=22.1 plies; 2.746kN/s
B=22.7 plies; 3.011kN/s} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6.
Be2 e5 7. O-O Nc6 8. d5 Ne7 9. Ne1 Nd7 10. Be3 f5 11. f3 f4 12. Bf2 g5 13. b4
Nf6 14. c5 Ng6 15. cxd6 cxd6 16. Rc1 Rf7 17. a4 Bf8 18. a5 Bd7 19. Nb5 g4 20.
Nxa7 g3 21. Bb6 {Both last book move} Qe8 {[%eval -31,26] [%emt 0:00:22]} 22.
Qc2 {[%eval 4,22] [%emt 0:00:12] (Rc7)} Rg7 {[%eval -80,22] [%emt 0:00:05]
(gxh2+)} 23. Qb2 {[%eval -5,23] [%emt 0:00:24] (Qd2)} gxh2+ {[%eval -97,23]
[%emt 0:00:18]} 24. Kxh2 {[%eval 0,23] [%emt 0:00:06] (Kf2)} Nh4 {[%eval -86,
25] [%emt 0:00:29]} 25. Kg1 {[%eval 0,23] [%emt 0:00:09]} Bh3 {[%eval -71,26]
[%emt 0:00:42] (Nh5)} 26. Rf2 {[%eval 34,21] [%emt 0:00:12]} Nh5 {[%eval -124,
28] [%emt 0:00:17] (Qg6)} 27. Bb5 {[%eval 0,24] [%emt 0:00:09]} Qg6 {[%eval
-111,23] [%emt 0:00:01]} 28. Rcc2 {[%eval 0,27] [%emt 0:00:14] (Rc7)} Kh8 {
[%eval -185,22] [%emt 0:00:03] (Ng3)} 29. Bd3 {[%eval -26,21] [%emt 0:00:12]
(Rc7)} Be7 {[%eval -216,22] [%emt 0:00:04]} 30. Qc1 {[%eval -91,21] [%emt 0:00:
25] (Nb5)} Rag8 {[%eval -362,20] [%emt 0:00:05] (Ng3)} 31. Nc8 {[%eval -36,19]
[%emt 0:00:05]} Bf8 {[%eval -437,22] [%emt 0:00:05]} 32. Qd1 {[%eval -180,20]
[%emt 0:00:07] (Qb1)} Qh6 {[%eval -515,22] [%emt 0:00:05] (Qe8)} 33. a6 {
[%eval -492,19] [%emt 0:00:19] (Bb5)} bxa6 {[%eval -555,20] [%emt 0:00:04]} 34.
Bxa6 {[%eval -651,21] [%emt 0:00:11]} Bd7 {[%eval -692,20] [%emt 0:00:03]
(Nxg2)} 35. Rf1 {[%eval -647,21] [%emt 0:00:13]} Ng3 {[%eval -711,19] [%emt 0:
00:01] (Ba4)} 36. Qd3 {[%eval -824,22] [%emt 0:00:17] (Kf2)} Nxg2 {[%eval -930,
23] [%emt 0:00:03] (Nxf1)} 37. Rxg2 {[%eval -1020,23] [%emt 0:00:05]} Bh3 {
[%eval -945,22] [%emt 0:00:01]} 38. Qc2 {[%eval -1104,25] [%emt 0:00:08] (Kf2)}
Qh4 {[%eval -1081,23] [%emt 0:00:04] (Bxg2)} 0-1
[/pgn]

[pgn]
[Event "K1101 - asmFish 220517 2x"]
[Site "I5-4200M @2500Mhz (Fritzmark4"]
[Date "2017.06.22"]
[Round "48"]
[White "asmFishW_2017-05-22_base"]
[Black "Komodo 11.01 64-bit"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "E99"]
[Annotator "-0.27;0.15"]
[PlyCount "75"]
[TimeControl "180+2"]

{Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-4200M CPU @ 2.50GHz 2494 MHz W=26.0 plies; 2.926kN/s
B=22.4 plies; 2.286kN/s} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6.
Be2 e5 7. O-O Nc6 8. d5 Ne7 9. Ne1 Nd7 10. Be3 f5 11. f3 f4 12. Bf2 g5 13. b4
Nf6 14. c5 Ng6 15. cxd6 cxd6 16. Rc1 Rf7 17. a4 Bf8 18. a5 Bd7 19. Nb5 g4 20.
Nxa7 g3 21. Bb6 {Both last book move} Qe8 {[%eval 15,22] [%emt 0:00:12]} 22.
Rc7 {[%eval -27,25] [%emt 0:00:18] (Qc2)} Qb8 {[%eval -13,23] [%emt 0:00:13]}
23. Nc6 {[%eval -29,25] [%emt 0:00:19]} bxc6 {[%eval -17,21] [%emt 0:00:04]}
24. dxc6 {[%eval -27,25] [%emt 0:00:08]} Be6 {[%eval 0,22] [%emt 0:00:16]} 25.
Rxf7 {[%eval -29,24] [%emt 0:00:18]} Kxf7 {[%eval 0,21] [%emt 0:00:08]} 26. Nd3
{[%eval 0,22] [%emt 0:00:13] (Qc2)} gxh2+ {[%eval -3,20] [%emt 0:00:12]} 27.
Kxh2 {[%eval -4,25] [%emt 0:00:15]} Nh5 {[%eval 0,23] [%emt 0:00:12] (d5)} 28.
Nb2 {[%eval 34,22] [%emt 0:00:04] (c7)} Ng3 {[%eval 0,22] [%emt 0:00:06]} 29.
Re1 {[%eval 0,22] [%emt 0:00:01] (b5)} Nxe2 {[%eval -14,20] [%emt 0:00:05]} 30.
Qxe2 {[%eval 0,26] [%emt 0:00:29]} Be7 {[%eval -16,20] [%emt 0:00:06]} 31. Rh1
{[%eval 0,29] [%emt 0:00:06] (Rc1)} h5 {[%eval -19,21] [%emt 0:00:10]} 32. Nc4
{[%eval 0,28] [%emt 0:00:03] (Rg1)} h4 {[%eval -16,21] [%emt 0:00:07]} 33. Rg1
{[%eval 0,29] [%emt 0:00:06]} Qh8 {[%eval 0,23] [%emt 0:00:18] (h3)} 34. b5 {
[%eval 33,22] [%emt 0:00:04] (Bf2)} h3 {[%eval 0,24] [%emt 0:00:13] (Qh6)} 35.
g4 {[%eval 0,28] [%emt 0:00:11]} fxg3+ {[%eval 0,25] [%emt 0:00:09]} 36. Rxg3 {
[%eval 0,29] [%emt 0:00:04]} Nf4 {[%eval 0,26] [%emt 0:00:10]} 37. Qf1 {[%eval
0,30] [%emt 0:00:08]} Nh5 {[%eval 0,27] [%emt 0:00:11]} 38. Rg1 {[%eval 0,31]
[%emt 0:00:03] Draw accepted} 1/2-1/2
[/pgn]

Jeroen
Posts: 501
Joined: Wed Mar 08, 2006 8:49 pm

SF loses after showing +5.44

Post by Jeroen » Sat Jun 24, 2017 11:06 am

This is the craziest game of the match. At move 22 Stockfish indicates a crushing +5.44 advantage, but still loses:

[pgn][Event "K1101 - asmFish 220517 2x"]
[Site "I5-4200M @2500Mhz (Fritzmark4"]
[Date "2017.06.23"]
[Round "67"]
[White "Komodo 11.01 64-bit"]
[Black "asmFishW_2017-05-22_base"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "E99"]
[Annotator "0.00;0.00"]
[PlyCount "117"]
[EventDate "2017.??.??"]
[TimeControl "180+2"]

{Int@l(R) Core(TM) i5-4200M CPU î 2.50GHz 2493 MHz W=23.7 plies; 2.741kN/s
B=24.5 plies; 3.319kN/s} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6.
Be2 e5 7. O-O Nc6 8. d5 Ne7 9. Ne1 Nd7 10. Be3 f5 11. f3 f4 12. Bf2 g5 13. Rc1
Rf6 14. b4 Rh6 15. c5 Qe8 16. Nb5 Qh5 17. h4 {Both last book move} Ng6 {
0.00/26 36} 18. Nxc7 {0.00/23 16 (g3)} Nxh4 {-4.28/23 8} 19. Bxh4 {-0.61/28 29}
Qxh4 {-4.84/21 1} 20. c6 {-2.18/22 23 (Qc2)} Nf6 {-5.96/22 8} 21. Qd3 {-3.05/
20 8} Rb8 {-5.33/19 2} 22. Bd1 {-3.53/21 13 (b5)} bxc6 {-5.44/23 17 (Nh5)} 23.
dxc6 {-3.15/20 12} Rxb4 {-3.56/25 36 (Kh8)} 24. Rc4 {-3.14/20 6} Rb8 {-3.97/25
9} 25. Nd5 {-1.43/21 11 (Rc1)} Nxd5 {-4.45/21 4} 26. Qxd5+ {-1.09/22 8 (Bb3)}
Be6 {-1.82/26 20} 27. Qd3 {-1.91/21 3} Kh8 {-2.34/25 3 (g4)} 28. Rc3 {-0.80/20
3 (c7)} Re8 {-2.67/24 6} 29. Bb3 {-0.34/22 10 (c7)} Bc8 {-2.18/26 12 (d5)} 30.
c7 {0.00/20 3} a5 {-2.13/24 1 (g4)} 31. Bc4 {0.00/23 4 (Rc6)} Bf6 {-1.49/29 11}
32. Qd5 {0.00/26 5 (Ba6)} Bg7 {0.00/25 16 (Rf8)} 33. Qxa5 {0.40/25 15 (Qd3)}
Bf6 {-1.91/23 7} 34. Qa4 {1.76/22 6 (Ba6)} Rf8 {1.17/26 9 (Qh5)} 35. Ba6 {
1.56/21 2} Be6 {2.10/25 7} 36. c8=Q {1.70/22 3} Bxc8 {2.40/23 2} 37. Bxc8 {
1.90/23 5} Bd8 {2.14/24 5} 38. Qb5 {1.72/24 6} d5 {2.08/22 1} 39. Rc6 {1.88/21
3} Rxc6 {2.54/25 10} 40. Qxc6 {2.73/22 10} dxe4 {2.52/24 7} 41. Bf5 {2.48/23 7
(Bh3)} e3 {2.48/25 11} 42. Nd3 {2.39/21 7} Qh5 {2.50/25 4 (g4)} 43. Rb1 {
2.91/21 4} Qe8 {2.68/23 0} 44. Qxe8 {3.01/23 7 (Qe4)} Rxe8 {2.64/24 4} 45. Rb8
{3.19/22 5 (Rb7)} Rg8 {2.62/22 4 (Kg8)} 46. Kf1 {3.24/23 4} Bc7 {3.30/24 7} 47.
Rb7 {3.13/23 3} Rf8 {3.10/22 1 (Rg7)} 48. Be4 {3.62/23 3 (Rxc7)} Rc8 {4.33/24 4
} 49. a4 {3.70/25 5 (Nb4)} Ba5 {3.20/20 2} 50. Rxh7+ {3.63/27 5 (Ra7)} Kg8 {
2.88/1 0} 51. Ra7 {3.93/26 2 (Rh5)} Bb6 {3.30/23 5} 52. Ra8 {5.03/30 9 (Rb7)}
Rxa8 {3.54/27 2} 53. Bxa8 {5.03/31 1} Bc7 {3.82/32 3 (Kf8)} 54. Nb2 {5.11/31 4
(Bd5+)} Kf7 {5.46/26 2 (Kg7)} 55. Nc4 {5.16/30 2} Ke8 {6.15/28 2 (Ke6)} 56. a5
{5.34/30 5} Kd8 {6.77/27 2 (Ke7)} 57. a6 {5.52/26 2} Bb8 {6.97/31 2} 58. Na5 {
5.75/27 2} Kd7 {7.89/27 2 (Bc7)} 59. Nc6 {6.98/25 1 (Be4)} 1-0[/pgn]

leavenfish
Posts: 223
Joined: Mon Sep 02, 2013 6:23 am

Re: New testsuite: King's Indian Mar del Plata

Post by leavenfish » Sat Jun 24, 2017 3:02 pm

Most interesting...one should give (I would think) VERY long thinking time in such a suite as the structure is already determined. Fast time controls would seem not as appropriate here.
One would think over a bunch of games an engine with a bit more positional 'understanding', would have an edge.

Vinvin
Posts: 4173
Joined: Thu Mar 09, 2006 8:40 am
Full name: Vincent Lejeune

Re: SF loses after showing +5.44

Post by Vinvin » Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:10 pm

Great attacking game on the h-file !
Jeroen wrote:This is the craziest game of the match. At move 22 Stockfish indicates a crushing +5.44 advantage, but still loses:

[pgn][Event "K1101 - asmFish 220517 2x"]
[Site "I5-4200M @2500Mhz (Fritzmark4"]
[Date "2017.06.23"]
[Round "67"]
[White "Komodo 11.01 64-bit"]
[Black "asmFishW_2017-05-22_base"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "E99"]
[Annotator "0.00;0.00"]
[PlyCount "117"]
[EventDate "2017.??.??"]
[TimeControl "180+2"]

{Int@l(R) Core(TM) i5-4200M CPU î 2.50GHz 2493 MHz W=23.7 plies; 2.741kN/s
B=24.5 plies; 3.319kN/s} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6.
Be2 e5 7. O-O Nc6 8. d5 Ne7 9. Ne1 Nd7 10. Be3 f5 11. f3 f4 12. Bf2 g5 13. Rc1
Rf6 14. b4 Rh6 15. c5 Qe8 16. Nb5 Qh5 17. h4 {Both last book move} Ng6 {
0.00/26 36} 18. Nxc7 {0.00/23 16 (g3)} Nxh4 {-4.28/23 8} 19. Bxh4 {-0.61/28 29}
Qxh4 {-4.84/21 1} 20. c6 {-2.18/22 23 (Qc2)} Nf6 {-5.96/22 8} 21. Qd3 {-3.05/
20 8} Rb8 {-5.33/19 2} 22. Bd1 {-3.53/21 13 (b5)} bxc6 {-5.44/23 17 (Nh5)} 23.
dxc6 {-3.15/20 12} Rxb4 {-3.56/25 36 (Kh8)} 24. Rc4 {-3.14/20 6} Rb8 {-3.97/25
9} 25. Nd5 {-1.43/21 11 (Rc1)} Nxd5 {-4.45/21 4} 26. Qxd5+ {-1.09/22 8 (Bb3)}
Be6 {-1.82/26 20} 27. Qd3 {-1.91/21 3} Kh8 {-2.34/25 3 (g4)} 28. Rc3 {-0.80/20
3 (c7)} Re8 {-2.67/24 6} 29. Bb3 {-0.34/22 10 (c7)} Bc8 {-2.18/26 12 (d5)} 30.
c7 {0.00/20 3} a5 {-2.13/24 1 (g4)} 31. Bc4 {0.00/23 4 (Rc6)} Bf6 {-1.49/29 11}
32. Qd5 {0.00/26 5 (Ba6)} Bg7 {0.00/25 16 (Rf8)} 33. Qxa5 {0.40/25 15 (Qd3)}
Bf6 {-1.91/23 7} 34. Qa4 {1.76/22 6 (Ba6)} Rf8 {1.17/26 9 (Qh5)} 35. Ba6 {
1.56/21 2} Be6 {2.10/25 7} 36. c8=Q {1.70/22 3} Bxc8 {2.40/23 2} 37. Bxc8 {
1.90/23 5} Bd8 {2.14/24 5} 38. Qb5 {1.72/24 6} d5 {2.08/22 1} 39. Rc6 {1.88/21
3} Rxc6 {2.54/25 10} 40. Qxc6 {2.73/22 10} dxe4 {2.52/24 7} 41. Bf5 {2.48/23 7
(Bh3)} e3 {2.48/25 11} 42. Nd3 {2.39/21 7} Qh5 {2.50/25 4 (g4)} 43. Rb1 {
2.91/21 4} Qe8 {2.68/23 0} 44. Qxe8 {3.01/23 7 (Qe4)} Rxe8 {2.64/24 4} 45. Rb8
{3.19/22 5 (Rb7)} Rg8 {2.62/22 4 (Kg8)} 46. Kf1 {3.24/23 4} Bc7 {3.30/24 7} 47.
Rb7 {3.13/23 3} Rf8 {3.10/22 1 (Rg7)} 48. Be4 {3.62/23 3 (Rxc7)} Rc8 {4.33/24 4
} 49. a4 {3.70/25 5 (Nb4)} Ba5 {3.20/20 2} 50. Rxh7+ {3.63/27 5 (Ra7)} Kg8 {
2.88/1 0} 51. Ra7 {3.93/26 2 (Rh5)} Bb6 {3.30/23 5} 52. Ra8 {5.03/30 9 (Rb7)}
Rxa8 {3.54/27 2} 53. Bxa8 {5.03/31 1} Bc7 {3.82/32 3 (Kf8)} 54. Nb2 {5.11/31 4
(Bd5+)} Kf7 {5.46/26 2 (Kg7)} 55. Nc4 {5.16/30 2} Ke8 {6.15/28 2 (Ke6)} 56. a5
{5.34/30 5} Kd8 {6.77/27 2 (Ke7)} 57. a6 {5.52/26 2} Bb8 {6.97/31 2} 58. Na5 {
5.75/27 2} Kd7 {7.89/27 2 (Bc7)} 59. Nc6 {6.98/25 1 (Be4)} 1-0[/pgn]

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