"castle", "castles", "castling"

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kgburcham
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"castle", "castles", "castling"

Post by kgburcham » Sun Dec 01, 2013 2:41 pm

noticed in the Stockfish update, then I had to go look it up.
Depends how it is used.
kgburcham

The choice as to which side to castle often hinges on an assessment of the trade-off between king safety and activity of the rook. Kingside castling is generally slightly safer, because the king ends up closer to the edge of the board and all the pawns on the castled side are defended by the king. In queenside castling, the king is placed closer to the center and the pawn on the a-file is undefended; the king is thus often moved to the b-file to defend the a-pawn and to move the king away from the center of the board. In addition, queenside castling requires moving the queen; therefore, it may take slightly longer to achieve than kingside castling. On the other hand, queenside castling places the rook more effectively – on the central d-file. It is often immediately active, whereas with kingside castling a tempo may be required to move the rook to a more effective square.

It is common for both players to castle kingside, and rare for both players to castle queenside. If one player castles kingside and the other queenside, it is called opposite (or opposite-side) castling. Castling on opposite sides usually results in a fierce fight as both players' pawns are free to advance to attack the opposing king's castled position without exposing the player's own castled king.

Albert Silver
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Re: "castle", "castles", "castling&

Post by Albert Silver » Sun Dec 01, 2013 3:02 pm

kgburcham wrote:noticed in the Stockfish update, then I had to go look it up.
Depends how it is used.
kgburcham

The choice as to which side to castle often hinges on an assessment of the trade-off between king safety and activity of the rook. Kingside castling is generally slightly safer, because the king ends up closer to the edge of the board and all the pawns on the castled side are defended by the king. In queenside castling, the king is placed closer to the center and the pawn on the a-file is undefended; the king is thus often moved to the b-file to defend the a-pawn and to move the king away from the center of the board. In addition, queenside castling requires moving the queen; therefore, it may take slightly longer to achieve than kingside castling. On the other hand, queenside castling places the rook more effectively – on the central d-file. It is often immediately active, whereas with kingside castling a tempo may be required to move the rook to a more effective square.

It is common for both players to castle kingside, and rare for both players to castle queenside. If one player castles kingside and the other queenside, it is called opposite (or opposite-side) castling. Castling on opposite sides usually results in a fierce fight as both players' pawns are free to advance to attack the opposing king's castled position without exposing the player's own castled king.
Not sure what the confusion was. Castling always refers to the king moving two squares to one side and bringing the rook around to the other.
"Tactics are the bricks and sticks that make up a game, but positional play is the architectural blueprint."

zullil
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Re: "castle", "castles", "castling&

Post by zullil » Sun Dec 01, 2013 3:58 pm

kgburcham wrote:noticed in the Stockfish update, then I had to go look it up.
Depends how it is used.
kgburcham

The choice as to which side to castle often hinges on an assessment of the trade-off between king safety and activity of the rook. Kingside castling is generally slightly safer, because the king ends up closer to the edge of the board and all the pawns on the castled side are defended by the king. In queenside castling, the king is placed closer to the center and the pawn on the a-file is undefended; the king is thus often moved to the b-file to defend the a-pawn and to move the king away from the center of the board. In addition, queenside castling requires moving the queen; therefore, it may take slightly longer to achieve than kingside castling. On the other hand, queenside castling places the rook more effectively – on the central d-file. It is often immediately active, whereas with kingside castling a tempo may be required to move the rook to a more effective square.

It is common for both players to castle kingside, and rare for both players to castle queenside. If one player castles kingside and the other queenside, it is called opposite (or opposite-side) castling. Castling on opposite sides usually results in a fierce fight as both players' pawns are free to advance to attack the opposing king's castled position without exposing the player's own castled king.
Not sure what your point is. :D

In English, words vary according to how they are used grammatically.

For example: Where to walk depends on many things. Walking is safer where traffic is light. If someone walks in front of a bus, he may be sorry he walked there.

Albert Silver
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Joined: Wed Mar 08, 2006 8:57 pm
Location: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Re: "castle", "castles", "castling&

Post by Albert Silver » Sun Dec 01, 2013 4:29 pm

zullil wrote:
kgburcham wrote:noticed in the Stockfish update, then I had to go look it up.
Depends how it is used.
kgburcham

The choice as to which side to castle often hinges on an assessment of the trade-off between king safety and activity of the rook. Kingside castling is generally slightly safer, because the king ends up closer to the edge of the board and all the pawns on the castled side are defended by the king. In queenside castling, the king is placed closer to the center and the pawn on the a-file is undefended; the king is thus often moved to the b-file to defend the a-pawn and to move the king away from the center of the board. In addition, queenside castling requires moving the queen; therefore, it may take slightly longer to achieve than kingside castling. On the other hand, queenside castling places the rook more effectively – on the central d-file. It is often immediately active, whereas with kingside castling a tempo may be required to move the rook to a more effective square.

It is common for both players to castle kingside, and rare for both players to castle queenside. If one player castles kingside and the other queenside, it is called opposite (or opposite-side) castling. Castling on opposite sides usually results in a fierce fight as both players' pawns are free to advance to attack the opposing king's castled position without exposing the player's own castled king.
Not sure what your point is. :D

In English, words vary according to how they are used grammatically.

For example: Where to walk depends on many things. Walking is safer where traffic is light. If someone walks in front of a bus, he may be sorry he walked there.
Such is the walk of life.
"Tactics are the bricks and sticks that make up a game, but positional play is the architectural blueprint."

Norm Pollock
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Re: "castle", "castles", "castling&

Post by Norm Pollock » Sun Dec 01, 2013 7:08 pm

On a meaningless sidenote...

There is a small tidbit in the rules that prevents "vertical" castling. I don't have the patience to look up what that rule is. But hypothetical "vertical" castling would occur after a pawn in the king's file promotes to a rook, and there are no obstacles between the king and that rook, and the king has not moved.

zullil
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Location: PA USA

Re: "castle", "castles", "castling&

Post by zullil » Sun Dec 01, 2013 7:26 pm

Norm Pollock wrote:On a meaningless sidenote...
Seems appropriate for this thread, the content of which I still don't understand! :D

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RJN
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Re: "castle", "castles", "castling&

Post by RJN » Sun Dec 01, 2013 7:31 pm

Not sure what the confusion was. Castling always refers to the king moving two squares to one side and bringing the rook around to the other.
Unless one is playing FRC, of course. :wink:

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