Adapter for non-standard chess engine to Winboard

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Carey
Posts: 313
Joined: Wed Mar 08, 2006 7:18 pm
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Re: Adapter for non-standard chess engine to Winboard

Post by Carey » Tue Oct 13, 2009 5:45 pm

Ron Murawski wrote:
Carey wrote:
Christopher Conkie wrote:Sorry to bother you Carey with a tangential question.

Is your site coming back? The one with all the oldies on it. It can be viewed in the Internet Archive which is not ideal, but at least it's something.

Christopher
Google changed their policy about allowing sites to have Javascript. They claimed it was for safety, but my guess is it allowed people to do their own designs and that didn't fit into google's desire to standardize the web sites using their web builder.

My site was entirely javascript. It was based on TiddlyWiki, which is a javascript wiki kind of thing.

So my site was no longer allowed.


I wasn't in any hurry to find some other free site that could host it because I didn't think anybody really cared.

I figured the few who did cared probably already got all of it, and I haven't found anything new in the last year or so. (I haven't had the energy / urge to keep hunting. I know of two classic programs the authors are slowly trying to get working, but they aren't ready yet.)

I can't put the site on just any free hosting place because most of them can't handle the complicated javascript. They usually try to rewrite it so they can put ads or tracking statistics etc.

Plus, some sites have policies about hosting certain kinds of iles, and other conditions.


I would have really prefered to a real wiki kind of site. That way people could add their own info about old programs and so on. Turn it into a real community effort. Kind of like how the ChessProgramming wiki is doing.

But those sites are very restrictive about what programs can be stored and they put their own license on any attached files. Which certainly wouldn't work considering the programs I'm posting are distributed with the author's permission but are still very copyrighted by them.
You are welcome to create as many chess-related pages as you like at the Computer-Chess Wiki
http://computer-chess.org/
The default setup is totally public and anyone can edit the pages. On request I can set up pages where only you (and I) can edit them.

Ron
Is this your site or is it hosted by somebody else? The commercial wikis, like where the ChessProgramming wiki is at, have licenses that are incompatable with the programs being saved & distributed. I have to be careful about that because these aren't my programs.


I would prefer it to be public. It'd let others add information too. That was one of the biggest problems of my old site. Authors etc. couldn't write their own info, people post info about old programs & the hardware they ran on, the tournaments, etc.

(I've mentioned to Bob Hyatt at least a half dozen times that he should start a book or something on all the old trivia and gatherings and stuff that went on in the early computer chess days. A lot of those old stories are actually interesting. And sometimes you learn new things, like who co-developed PVS (accidently or on purpose) or who really developed iterative deepinging, and so on.)

If the license is compatable, I might be interested, but right now I don't have the time to convert the tiddlywiki info into a web wiki.

If it is your site, how will you handle situations where people want to post old 8-bit micro programs, like Sargon, Mychess, Atari 2600 Chess, etc. etc.?

I've gotten a few requests to post things like that and I always have to explain that even though they are old, they are still copyrighted. And that because of the interest in emulators etc., there's always the possibility that somebody will actually want to resell it as part of a nostalgic pack for a cell phone or something.

(The reality is I seriously doubt anyone would care if old 8 bit micro chess programs were distributed. But I didn't want to take any unneeded legal risks, especially since I was using a public web host.)

Ron Murawski
Posts: 397
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 3:38 am
Location: Schenectady, NY
Contact:

Re: Adapter for non-standard chess engine to Winboard

Post by Ron Murawski » Tue Oct 13, 2009 7:18 pm

Carey wrote:
Ron Murawski wrote:
Carey wrote:
Christopher Conkie wrote:Sorry to bother you Carey with a tangential question.

Is your site coming back? The one with all the oldies on it. It can be viewed in the Internet Archive which is not ideal, but at least it's something.

Christopher
Google changed their policy about allowing sites to have Javascript. They claimed it was for safety, but my guess is it allowed people to do their own designs and that didn't fit into google's desire to standardize the web sites using their web builder.

My site was entirely javascript. It was based on TiddlyWiki, which is a javascript wiki kind of thing.

So my site was no longer allowed.


I wasn't in any hurry to find some other free site that could host it because I didn't think anybody really cared.

I figured the few who did cared probably already got all of it, and I haven't found anything new in the last year or so. (I haven't had the energy / urge to keep hunting. I know of two classic programs the authors are slowly trying to get working, but they aren't ready yet.)

I can't put the site on just any free hosting place because most of them can't handle the complicated javascript. They usually try to rewrite it so they can put ads or tracking statistics etc.

Plus, some sites have policies about hosting certain kinds of iles, and other conditions.


I would have really prefered to a real wiki kind of site. That way people could add their own info about old programs and so on. Turn it into a real community effort. Kind of like how the ChessProgramming wiki is doing.

But those sites are very restrictive about what programs can be stored and they put their own license on any attached files. Which certainly wouldn't work considering the programs I'm posting are distributed with the author's permission but are still very copyrighted by them.
You are welcome to create as many chess-related pages as you like at the Computer-Chess Wiki
http://computer-chess.org/
The default setup is totally public and anyone can edit the pages. On request I can set up pages where only you (and I) can edit them.

Ron
Is this your site or is it hosted by somebody else? The commercial wikis, like where the ChessProgramming wiki is at, have licenses that are incompatable with the programs being saved & distributed. I have to be careful about that because these aren't my programs.


I would prefer it to be public. It'd let others add information too. That was one of the biggest problems of my old site. Authors etc. couldn't write their own info, people post info about old programs & the hardware they ran on, the tournaments, etc.

(I've mentioned to Bob Hyatt at least a half dozen times that he should start a book or something on all the old trivia and gatherings and stuff that went on in the early computer chess days. A lot of those old stories are actually interesting. And sometimes you learn new things, like who co-developed PVS (accidently or on purpose) or who really developed iterative deepinging, and so on.)

If the license is compatable, I might be interested, but right now I don't have the time to convert the tiddlywiki info into a web wiki.

If it is your site, how will you handle situations where people want to post old 8-bit micro programs, like Sargon, Mychess, Atari 2600 Chess, etc. etc.?

I've gotten a few requests to post things like that and I always have to explain that even though they are old, they are still copyrighted. And that because of the interest in emulators etc., there's always the possibility that somebody will actually want to resell it as part of a nostalgic pack for a cell phone or something.

(The reality is I seriously doubt anyone would care if old 8 bit micro chess programs were distributed. But I didn't want to take any unneeded legal risks, especially since I was using a public web host.)
The site is my own. My only consideration is to stay within the law so I cannot get sued. If an individual put up an old chess engine for download and someone complained claiming copyright I would remove that download file. Since no one is profiting from these old programs, removal is probably enough to prevent lawsuits. (Any lawyers out there willing to give some advice?) Other than that, you can do what you wish as long as the topic remains chess-related.

BTW, there are free, open source tools available to convert pages from one wiki's syntax to another's. Or from html to wiki syntax.

Ron

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